Devil’s Third Is Awesome!!!!!!

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Photograph from Bago Games of Devil’s Third by Valhalla Games Studios

Thank you, Mister Itakagi Tomonobu. Thank you, again, Mister Itakagi Tomonobu!!! Thank you, Nintendo. Thank you Mister Satoru  Iwata. Thank you, Nintendo!!! Thank you, Valhalla Game Studios. Thank you, Valhalla Game Studios!!!

Everyone involved in bringing this masterpiece, to a Nintendo system, should be apologized to a million times, and thanked a million times more.
Each of these participants in this great work got something out of it. First, Devil’s Third on the Nintendo Wii U is spectacular. Let’s try it again. DEVIL’S THIRD ON THE NINTENDO WII U IS SPECTACULAR!!!

I cannot explain, nor, truly, write a real review for the game, Devil’s Third, by Valhalla Game Studios, and brought to the United States by Nintendo. This is only my first time through. I do not really want to write a review.

If you have ever played Ninja Gaiden, the game is about the experience.

Itakagi Tomonobu creates experiences that are precisely complete, challenge the player, and ask that you raise your skills beyond what the game requires.

I actually have built up frustration over the expectation of this kind of game. It comes from past game play expectations from other video games.

I used to play games like Contra, Sector Z, Halo, and the many G.I Joe-type games in order to get the feel of playing a game that puts you in the combat. At times, you get a title that is a shooter, or it has some form of melee combat, but not a strong balance of both. Years later, Itakagi Tomonobu, the legend behind Ninja Gaiden’s legacy, brings a game that gives you all that you want, if you want hybrid action. Hybrid means, in this case, a tight balance between gun, intelligent, and hand-to-hand combat.

There is a catch. You have to play smart in every aspect of this experience, from start to finish. For example, in Ninja Gaiden, every player has a plethora of weapons to use at a time. The katana blade has a balance that allows you to take down enemies, but suffers, as it is steady. A staff adds distance to your attacks, but leaves players vulnerable to quicker, multiple, and more accurate enemies. Ninja Gaiden was always a battle of man versus computer intelligence, along gorgeous, smartly developed, levels. The games pushed you to the peak of your patience, and smarts. Ninja Gaiden dealt specifically with hand-to-hand combat.

Devil’s Third continues this epic tradition and switches the balance from the melee aspect and ask that you operate with more intelligence, not only in close quarters, but mainly, with cover, gun play, and strategy.

Strategy. Strategy. Once more, Strategy.
This level of strategy starts with the controller you plan to use with the game. The Nintendo Pro Controller is the best weapon in this case. You start the game, recognize your environment, and simply play. You must know your cover. The controls are tight. Your melee is cold and precise. The guns are awesome. The enemies plot and plan against your attacks. Players beware.

The key to all of this is how you plan to attack your enemy. It always has been, and always will. For example, you have two rifles, a shotgun, and an AK-47. An enemy fires a rocket launcher at a distance toward you.

You have many ways to take down the enemy. You can trust your character’s body, rush the rocket launcher, and simply hack him to pieces. The player could use the shotgun, and move to a point, where you can simply take down the assailant. It is also possible to simply fire from distance and take your enemy down. There are no control issues, no level glitches; Devil’s Third unfolds, as it should. It is hard, but with patience and strategy, the game is fun, rewarding and a worthy purchase at $60, thus far. It has an online component, but I have yet to test it.

I bet it not only pushes Valhalla Game Studios, but also makes great use of Nintendo’s hardware. It makes me upset seeing some reviews for this game. This is the only game of its kind on a Nintendo system. It is rewarding. However, negative exposure pushes real players from a truly epic experience.

There is a level, I will not disclose, but it reminds me of actually working in a scene from the film, the Matrix.

The use of terrain and clan aspects of the title allows players to consider either an army of one scenario, or to really look at the weapons at your disposal and consider the different options available. Devil’s Third is good, if not great, and it is a shame more people do not know. I hope this helps to draw more people to its challenging nature.

Thank you, again, Mister Itakagi Tomonobu. Thank you, again, Nintendo. Thank you, Valhalla Game Studios.

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